Minnesota state board certifies 2020 election results; state sets voter turnout record

Associated Press/KSTP
Updated: November 25, 2020 06:05 AM
Created: November 24, 2020 12:25 PM

Minnesota’s state canvassing board met Tuesday and officially certified the state’s 2020 election results.

Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon announced Minnesota had the highest voter turnout in the country for the third election in a row. Additionally, the state set a record for highest total number of voters ever — 3,292,997 — which is also the state's highest turnout by percentage since 1956 at 79.95%.

"Even as we celebrate a third consecutive election leading the nation in turnout, I know that Minnesota can do more to make every voice heard. No matter where they live in Minnesota, or what language they speak, or what accommodations they need to cast their ballot, I look forward to continuing my mission to make it as easy as possible for every eligible Minnesotan to vote," Simon said.

Of the total number of voters, Simon said 1,906,383 Minnesotans voted absentee — nearly 58% of voters — shattering the previous record for absentee votes in 2018, which was around 24% of votes by absentee.

The ordinarily routine task drew closer attention due to President Donald Trump’s efforts to delay it in key states.

Joe Biden defeated Trump in Minnesota by more than 230,000 votes, or about 7 percentage points.

Minnesota’s board is made up of Simon, a Democrat, and four judges. Three of the four were appointed by Democratic governors and the fourth by independent former Gov. Jesse Ventura.

A handful of Republican lawmakers or candidates and several voters asked the Minnesota Supreme Court to delay the vote, alleging a variety of problems with the election.

3 Minnesota House lawmakers file lawsuit against Secretary of State Simon


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